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Instagram debuts 60-second videos for all users - here's why that benefits everyone

Industry News

The photo and video sharing platform has rolled out 60-second videos for all users, which eliminates the previous 15-second cap it had placed on users’ content since it debuted videos in 2013. The change comes shortly after Instagram increased the length of video advertisements to 60 seconds and added a video view counter in February.

 

Original Source: Business Intelligence, Andrew Meola

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This 60-second limit should facilitate cross-platform campaigns. Longer videos make it easier for brands to create content that could appear on television, mobile, and desktop rather than making 15-second videos specifically for Instagram.

 

Now, content creators can think about Instagram first, which would let them have a greater social presence without sacrificing other platforms.

 

This change should also encourage brands to create more content for Instagram. The 60-second limit would make it worthwhile for brands to bring in celebrities and famous content creators to promote their products.

 

Finally, brands who are used to promoting on YouTube and Facebook should now find it easier to create videos for Instagram without the 15-second restriction.

 

Mobile video has become increasingly important for both consumers and brands in recent years. Users are accustomed to opening an app and sharing a quick video with their friends, while companies know that an important way to reach consumers is to beam a relevant video directly into their pockets.

 

Margaret Boland, research analyst for BI Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service, has compiled a detailed report on mobile video that takes a look at how short-form mobile video has exploded. The report examines how YouTube, the historically dominant force in short-form video, was slow to implement a mobile video strategy, opening the door for new players —namely Facebook and Snapchat — to emerge.

 

It also takes a look at how winners will begin to emerge in distinct video content categories. YouTube, for instance, will rely heavily on its homegrown YouTube stars to distinguish its video library and drive loyalty. Facebook will become the go-to place for brands and media companies to engage with the largest audience. And Snapchat will utilize its live-events coverage and exclusive content to promote video communication among younger mobile audiences.

 

Here are some key takeaways from the report:

 

The rise in mobile video viewing can be attributed to several factors: an increase in overall time spent on mobile, the convenience of on-demand viewing, a preference for digital video viewing, and the increased availability of mobile video content.

 

As video becomes mobile-first, YouTube’s hold on the short-form video industry is waning. The number of videos that are uploaded to the platform per month has remained stagnant over the past year, according to Socialbakers data shared with BI Intelligence.

 

Facebook is in the best position to upset YouTube as the go-to place for brand and media companies to upload videos and for users to watch these videos. Although Snapchat may not be competing with Facebook and YouTube on video volume, the app is changing how consumers, brands, and publishers are using mobile video for communication, news and entertainment, and live-event coverage.

 

In full, the report:

 

Maps out the rise of mobile video viewing and lays out the main drivers of this trend.

 

Examines why YouTube’s hold on the short-form video industry is waning as viewers migrate to mobile viewing.
Illustrates the dramatic increase in the number of videos that brands and media companies are publishing to Facebook over the past year.

 

Forecasts the number of videos that US brands and media companies will publish to both Facebook and YouTube in 2016.
Explains how Snapchat is able to compete with larger video platforms and is changing how brands, media companies, and consumers are using mobile video.

 

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